Central State University

History

This university began with its parent institution, Wilberforce University, which is affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. In 1887, the Ohio General Assembly enacted legislation that created a combined Normal and Industrial Department at Wilberforce, whose objectives were to provide teacher training for African-Americans, inaugurate technical training programs, and stabilize these programs for minority students by assuring a financial base similar to that of other state-supported institutions.

In 1941, this department’s name was changed to the College of Education and Industrial Arts.

In 1951, it split from its parent and became Central State College. Almost 15 years later, it became Central State University.

Academic Merit

Central State University includes these disciplines:

Graphic Design
Studio Art
Music
Jazz Studies
Humanities
Africana Studies
English
History
International Languages and Literatures
Journalism and Mass Communication
Philosophy and Religion
Theatre
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Criminal Justice
Gerontology
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Social Work

Campus Life

The campus consists of verdant green lawns with beautiful flowering shrubs, trees, and flowerbeds, centered by attractive sunken gardens. Across the road you’ll find the University’s outdoor education area, a natural reserve, and the Robeson Center, a National Afro–American Museum and Cultural Center, that chronicles Black history and sponsors a variety of programs.

Campus facilities encompass the Cosby Mass Communications Center, Hallie Q. Brown Memorial Library, Clara A. Henderson College of Education, Newsom Administration Building, McLin International Center, Galloway Tower and Walter G. Sellers Alumni Center, among other buildings.

ADDRESS: 1400 Brush Row Road, Wilberforce, OH
PHONE: 800-388-2781 or 937-376-6011
WEBSITE: https://www.centralstate.edu

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