monkey, Nevis Eco-Travel

This is not the only Nevis monkey you will see; credit Nevis Tourist Authority

Nevis Eco-Travel

Nevis Eco-travel has evolved from the era of an agricultural-economy to a Caribbean island has dependent on tourism where eco-systems are celebrated and protected. For that reasons, all beaches are public and construction is forbidden beyond one thousand feet above sea level. The natural beauty is stunning. In his case the tagline rings true, its Nevis naturally.

Volunteers work at night on the beaches tagging sea turtles and collecting information about their nesting and movement. Why not join them one evening and help? Additional information is collected by the Nevis Turtle Group on morning surveys and they also give presentations to local schools.

The Rain Forests and foothills are filled with trails for hikers, ramblers and mountain bikers to explore. The thick jungles are full of fascinating plants and trees as well as stunning views. Wildlife is all around including donkeys, goats, monkeys and tropical birds.

Hikers will enjoy the 7 volcanic centers of Nevis. These include Saddle Hill, Round Hill, Cades Bay, Hurricane Hill, Butlers Mountain, Red Cliff and last but not least Nevis Peak. These are mainly andesite and dacite lava domes, with associated block and ash flows, plus lahars. Nevis Peak has the highest elevation at 984 meters. Cades Bay and Farm Estate Soufriere feature hydrothermal activity.

Water has been piped since 1911 from a spring called the “Source”, located 1800 feet up the mountain, to storage tanks at Rawlins Village, and since 1912, to Butler’s Village. Additional drinking water comes from Nelson’s Spring near Cotton Ground and Bath Spring. The coastline is filled with many different color sands and rocks of all sizes. It’s a playground for beachcombers, romantic walks and horseback rides.

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